Deciphering the role of the phenylpropanoid metabolism in the tolerance of Capsicum annuum L. to Verticillium dahliae Kleb.

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Deciphering the role of the phenylpropanoid metabolism in the tolerance of Capsicum annuum  L. to Verticillium dahliae  Kleb.

Publication Type:

Journal Article

Source:

Plant Science, Volume 258, p.12-20 (2017)

Keywords:

Enabling Technologies, Plants

Abstract:

Verticillium dahliae is an economically relevant soilborne pathogen that causes vascular wilt in several crops, including pepper (Capsicum annuum). Fungal infection is usually visualized as a vascular browning, likely due to the onset of phenylpropanoid metabolism, which also seems to play a crucial role in the tolerance of some pepper varieties. In the current work, the potential function of distinct phenylpropanoid derivatives (suberin, lignin and phenolic compounds) in the pepper tolerance response against V. dahliae, was investigated. Histochemical and biochemical analyses ruled out suberin as a key player in the pepper-fungus interaction. However, changes observed in lignin composition and higher deposition of bound phenolics in infected stems seemed to contribute to the reinforcement of cell walls and the impairment of V. dahliae colonization. Most importantly, this is the first time that the accumulation of the hydroxycinnamic acid amide N-feruloyltyramine was reported in pepper stems in response to a vascular fungus. Fungitoxic activity for that hydroxycinnamate-tyramine conjugate was demonstrated as well.