RET Projects

GLBRC's Education and Outreach Educational Programs

RET Projects

Every summer since 2009, GLBRC has hosted two to four teachers who spend 7 weeks conducting biofuels research with our scientists and developing related activities to bring back to their classes through our Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program. Below you can browse through past projects and download associated bioenergy lessons and activities developed by participants.

Please visit our Education Materials page for additional investigations, activities, units and resources developed in collaboration with educators, education researchers and GLBRC scientists.

2016

Yeast Biodiversity, Ecology, and Biotechnology

Yeasts are great at converting sugars to fuels, but we know surprisingly little about their natural habitats, ecology, and biodiversity. Yeasts are single-celled fungi that vary widely in their ability to consume sugars and tolerate the harsh industrial processes and chemicals necessary for biofuel production. Some yeasts naturally make ethanol, some make oils, and some can be engineered to make other fuels and chemicals. There are over 1,000 described species of yeasts that harbor more genetic diversity than all vertebrates. Every year, new species and diverse populations are being discovered across the world and right here in Wisconsin.

Lisa Sorlie, library tech specialist and science teacher, joined the Yeast Exploration and Analysis Science Team (YEAST) and began searching for new species of wild yeast in soil and bark samples from her schoolyard. Using modern molecular and microbiological lab techniques, Lisa cultured, isolated, sequenced, and identified numerous wild yeast species. At the same time, she developed a biodiversity and evolution unit targeted to middle school students to learn about phylogentic trees and the genetic basis of traits in yeast and humans. Students used the NCBI database to look up and identify different species of wild yeast based upon their genetic code. Read more about her lesson in this story.

RET Participant: Lisa Sorlie, library tech specialist and science teacher, Bonduel School District, WI

Research Mentors: Quinn Langdon, Professor Chris Todd Hittinger

Project Files: Office presentation icon Lisa's RET presentation

Ecosystem Carbon Cycling in Bioenergy Cropping Systems

Stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide is a key component of mitigating global climate change. Replacing fossil fuels with biofuels can help by reducing net carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, biofuel cropping systems can also help reduce atmospheric carbon by storing organic carbon in soils. Plants are the conduit of carbon transfer between the atmosphere and soils as they remove carbon dioxide from the air through photosynthesis and incorporate the carbon into biomass. When plants die, some of their biomass becomes carbon-rich soil organic matter, however, the amount of carbon stored in the soil depends on plant type and land management practices. Understanding how different biofuel plant types and management practices impact carbon storage in soils is an important step in determining the overall sustainability of biofuel crops.

Dr. Leon Walls, Associate Professor of Science Education, University of Vermont, helped Adam von Haden and Prof. Chris Kucharik run an incubation experiment to determine the rates at which how different types of biomass decompose and form stable forms of soil carbon. At the same time, Leon developed instructional materials and tools to use in his undergraduate courses for pre-service elementary teachers to help them develop effective activities for students to learn about the science of sustainability and the carbon cycle. Read more in this story.

RET Participant: Dr. Leon Walls, Associate Professor of Science Education, University of Vermont

Research Mentors: Adam von Haden, Professor Chris Kucharik

Project Files: PDF icon Leon Walls RET Presentation

Breeding Switchgrass as a Sustainable Biofuel Crop

Switchgrass is a productive native prairie grass species seen as a promising sustainable feedstock for next generation biofuel production. However, the biomass yields of standard switchgrass varieties lags behind commercial bioenergy crops, such as corn. Cherrie Ann Maner, biology teacher at Fond du Lac High School, WI, joined a team of geneticists applying a variety of traditional and modern plant breeding techniques to develop new and highly productive switchgrass varieties for cellulosic bioenergy production in the future. Through a combination of lab and field work, she helped researchers identify and select for the key genes that confer desirable traits for sustainable biofuel production. Based upon this research, Cherrie developed a lesson for AP Biology students to investigate how markers help geneticist identify genes that control flowering time in switchgrass. Students analyzed real data generated and published from this research in Prof. Micke Casler's lab. Read more in this story.

RET Participant: Cherrie Ann Maner, biology teacher, Fond du Lac High School, WI

Research Mentors: Professor Michael Casler and Dr. Carl-Erik Tornqvist

Project Files: File Cherrie Ann Maner RET Presentation, Package icon Investigating Swtichgrass Breeding and Genetics AP Bio Investigation

2015

Yeast Biodiversity, Ecology and Biotechnology

Yeasts are great at converting sugars to fuels, but we know surprisingly little about their natural habitats, ecology, and biodiversity. Yeasts are single-celled fungi that vary widely in their ability to consume sugars and tolerate the harsh industrial processes and chemicals necessary for biofuel production. Some yeasts naturally make ethanol, some make oils, and some can be engineered to make other fuels and chemicals. There are more than 1,000 described species of yeast that harbor more genetic diversity than all vertebrates. Every year, new species and diverse populations are being discovered across the world and right here in Wisconsin.

Angela Sheddan, science teacher at Freeport HS, IL, joined the Yeast Exploration and Analysis Science Team (YEAST) and began searching for new species of wild yeast in soil and bark samples from her schoolyard. Using modern molecular and microbiological lab techniques, Angela cultured, isolated, sequenced, and identified numerous wild yeast species. At the same time, she adapted the lab protocol to be used with her chemistry and biotech students and developed modeling activities to teach the chemistry concepts behind gel electrophoresis.

This RET position was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DEB-1253634.

RET Participant: Angela Sheddan, chemistry and biotechnology teacher at Freeport H.S., IL

Research Mentors: Prof. Chris Todd Hittinger, Quinn Langdon

Project Files: PDF icon Angela Sheddan final presentation, File Modeling Gel Electrophoresis with Paperclips Activity

Design of Bio-derived Gasoline Fuels (Engine Research)

An important consideration when evaluating alternative liquid transportation fuels is the end application of the fuel in internal-combustion (IC) engines. For both spark-ignition engines and compression-ignition (diesel) engines specific fuel properties must be achieved for the fuel to enable reliable vehicle operation over a broad range of conditions. Of particular importance are properties that affect the practical operation of the engine and those that impact engine performance, emissions, and efficiency.

Leah Williams, chemistry teacher at Middleton HS, WI, joined the UW-Madison Engine Research Center for her second summer in the RET program. Leah analyzed the particulate emissions associated with the combustion of different bio-derived fuel mixtures. At the same time, she developed an investigation for students to study the effect of fuel-to-air ratio on the combustion of natural gas in a bunsen burner.

RET Participant: Leah Williams, chemistry teacher at Middleton HS, WI

Research Mentors: Prof. David Rothamer, Michael Groendyk, Steven Sakai, Dustin Witkowski

Project Files: PDF icon Leah Willams RET Presentation Summer 2015.pdf

Benefical Insects in Bioenergy Grasslands

Perennial grasslands generally support a higher abundance and diversity of beneficial insects (i.e., predators and pollinators) compared to conventional biofuel crops such as corn. However, the disturbance caused by large-scale harvesting of grasslands for biofuel production might have negative consequences for these insects. In this study, we asked whether harvesting perennial grasslands decreases the abundance of beneficial insects and their ecosystem services (e.g., pest suppression and pollination). We also investigated whether the composition of the landscape surrounding a grassland field could offset the negative effects of harvesting by serving as a refuge or a source of colonists.

Maura Mullen, environmental science teacher at Sun Prairie HS, WI, joined a research team in the Gratton Lab studying the insect communities and their pollination and pest supression services in 20 grassland sites around Madison. Based on this experience, Maura developed a lab sequence for her students to investigate the biodiversity services that insect communities at their school could be providing for neighboring farmers.

RET Participant: Maura Mullen, environmental science teacher, Sun Prairie H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Claudio Gratton, Tania Kim, Brian Spiesman

Project Files: PDF icon Maura Mullen 2015 RET Final Presentation, Package icon Beneficial Bugs Schoolyard Biodiversity Investigations

Fungal Partnerships with Plant Roots and Bioenergy Production

Almost all the world’s plants (~80% of species that have been studied) form underground partnerships with fungi. These fungi (called mycorrhizae) live in close association with the cells in plant roots, and are generally assumed to be beneficial because they provide plants with essential nutrients (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus) and can increase drought resistance. These fungi act to increase the root surface area in the soil, boosting a plant's capacity to acquire soil resources. In exchange, the plant provides sugars to the fungi. Some plants will grow extremely poorly or not at all without the right community of fungi. However, not all mycorrhizae are beneficial to all plants and the abundance and types of mycorrhizae found in the soil can be changed by human disturbances and land management. For example, fertilization can alter the mycorrhizae community as well as decrease the benefit of the association for the plant.

Ashley Carroll, science teacher at Gull Lake Middle School, MI, joined a group of researchers investigating mycorrhizal relationships in several grass species grown for biofuel at the W K. Kellogg Biological Station (KBS) in southwestern Michigan. She helped assess the impact of crop type and fertilization on the presence of mycorrhizae and their benefit to plant growth using a variety of molecular and field research methods. She also developed an investigation in which students measure the effects of mycorrhizae on plants grown in the classroom and then use microscopes to identify the different forms of fungi associated with the plant roots.

RET Participant: Ashley Carroll, science teacher at Gull Lake Middle School, MI

Research Mentors: Karen-Stahlheber Nikolakakis, Kay Gross

Project Files: PDF icon Ashely Carroll RET Presentation Summer 2015.pdf, Package icon investigating plants and fungi soil ecosystem interactions

2014

Yeast Biodiversity, Ecology and Biotechnology

Yeasts are great at converting sugars to fuels, but we know surprisingly little about their natural habitats, ecology, and biodiversity. Yeasts are single-celled fungi that vary widely in their ability to consume sugars and tolerate the harsh industrial processes and chemicals necessary for biofuel production. Some yeasts naturally make ethanol, some make oils, and some can be engineered to make other fuels and chemicals. There are over 1,000 described species of yeast that harbor more genetic diversity than all vertebrates. Every year, new species and diverse populations are being discovered across the world and right here in Wisconsin.

Sarah Wright, biology and biotechnology teacher at Monona Grove H.S., WI, joined the Yeast Exploration and Analysis Science Team (YEAST) and began searching for new species of wild yeast in soil and bark samples from her schoolyard. Using modern molecular and microbiological lab techniques, Sarah cultured, isolated, sequenced and identified numerous wild yeast species. At the same time, Sarah created simplified versions of the protocols used by the researchers so that her high school biotechnology students can collect, isolate and identify wild yeast species growing in their environment. She also developed a variation on the GLBRC Fermentation in a Bag activity in which students bioprospect for wild yeast in in their environment and compare the fermentation rates of yeast communities living in environmental samples, such as soil, bark or leaves.

This RET position was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DEB-1253634.

RET Participant: Sarah Wright, biology and biotechnology teacher at Monona Grove High School, WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Chris Todd Hittinger, Quinn Langdon

Project Files: PDF icon Sarah_Wright_RET_Presentation_2014.pdf, Package icon Wild YEAST Classroom Protocols Draft 082014.zip, File Fermentation in a Bag with Wild Yeast Student handouts.docx

Design of Bio-derived Gasoline Fuels (Engine Research)

An important consideration when evaluating alternative liquid transportation fuels is the end application of the fuel in internal-combustion (IC) engines. For both spark-ignition engines and compression-ignition (diesel) engines, specific fuel properties must be achieved for the fuel to enable reliable vehicle operation over a broad range of conditions. Of particular importance are properties that affect the practical operation of the engine and those that impact engine performance, emissions, and efficiency.

Leah Williams, chemistry teacher at Middleton HS, WI, joined the UW-Madison Engine Research Center to conduct research comparing the volatility of gasoline with bio-derived fuels. Leah created a series of activities for students to study the volatility of various potential biofuels in the chemistry classroom. In the process, students design their own fuel mixtures and test their fuel's suitability to replace a reference fuel by generating and comparing distillation curves. Materials for the main distillation lab activity are included here. Please visit Leah's teaching site for additional chemistry lessons and activites that she used to provide the necessary background for this lab.

RET Participant: Leah Williams, chemistry teacher at Middleton HS, WI

Research Mentors: Prof. David Rothamer, Alison Ferris, Michael Groendyk

Project Files: Package icon Teacher materials.zip, Package icon Student handouts.zip

Improved Microbes for Efficient Biofuel Production

The process of chemically treating biomass so that it can be converted into biofuels releases a host of plant compounds (lignotoxins) that are toxic to microbes that carry out fermentation. This presents a significant challenge to efficient conversion of plant sugars to biofuels. The Experimental Fermentation Laboratory (EFL) at GLBRC has formulated a synthetic medium designed to mimic the properties of real liquefied biomass, allowing the controlled manipulation and study of how different toxins affect microbial growth and, in turn, efficient biofuel production.

Tom Martinez, Glenbard East High School, IL, assisted with studies designed to test the effect of lignotoxins, either individually or in combination, on the growth of yeast and bacteria. In addition, he learned directed evolution and genomic techniques to improve microbial resistance to lignotoxins. Based on his research experience, Tom developed a series of labs for advanced HS and undergraduate biology and biotech courses in which students investigate antibiotic resistance and the directed evolution of standard bakers yeast to tolerate toxins such as ethanol, biomass by-products (eg. GVL) and foot fungus spray.

RET Participant: Tom Martinez, biology and biotech teacher at Glenbard East High School, IL

Research Mentors: Jeff Piotrowski and Donna Bates

Project Files: Package icon Teacher Materials - Directed Evolution of Yeast.zip, Package icon Student Materials - Directed Evolution of Yeast.zip

Investigating Biomass of Pretreatment and Enzyme Digestion for Biofuel Production

Toby West, career and tech ed. instructor at Lewanee Intermediate School District Tech Center, MI, conducted research with Dr. Jonathon Walton’s lab at Michigan State University comparing the ethanol yields from corn biomass and five different “weeds” using different enzymes and pretreatment methods. At the same time, Toby worked with Dr. Joyce Parker and the GLBRC curriculum development team to develop a teacher’s guide and accompanying lessons for helping students trace energy and matter through biofuel production at different spatial scales (See the Biofuels vs Fossil Fuels Unit). By the end of the summer, Toby also had updated his biodiesel and corn ethanol labs, created a colony PCR protocol as an extension to the GLBRC Bioprospecting Lab and summarized results of his research on converting weeds to ethanol. All of the materials that Toby developed can be downloaded below.

RET Participant: Toby West, career and tech ed. instructor at Lewanee Intermediate School District Tech Center, MI

Research Mentors: Jonathan Walton and Joyce Parker

Project Files: Package icon Biodiesel Lab.zip, Package icon Bioprospecting Colony PCR Extension.zip, File Corn Ethanol Lab - Student Version.docx, File Transportation Fuel Lesson - What Drives You.docx

2013

Sustainable Bioenergy Cropping Systems

Erin Parker, environmental science teacher at Madison East H.S., WI, worked with various research mentors in the Jackson and Gratton Lab to investigate nitrogen fluxes and biodiversity ecosystem services in bioenergy cropping systems. Erin developed a series of activities to help students understand the nitrogen cycle across local and global scales. Students can use sample data from GLBRC cropping systems trials to analyze and trace how N is moving through the system.

RET Participant: Erin Parker

Research Mentors: Gregg Sanford, Gary Oates, Tania Kim, Brian Spiesman

Project Files: Package icon Instructional materials for mock UN panel on regulating nitrogen use

The Chemistry of Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass

Marin Dobson, biology and biotech teacher at Fort Atkinson H.S., WI, worked with mentors Shishir Chundawat and Kate Helmich in the Fox Lab to analyze how biomass composition and different enzyme mixtures affect glucose and ethanol yields in the conversion process. Marin helped develop protocols that would allow high school and undergraduate classes compare the chemical composition of different biomass feedstocks. He also developed classroom activities using Legos and Pymol software to help students visualize the action of cellulase enzymes in the conversion process.

RET Participant: Marin Dobson

Research Mentors: Shishir Chundawat, Kate Helmich, Brian Fox

Project Files: PDF icon RET Presentation Aug 9.pdf, File Compositional analysis protocol August 2013.docx, File Modeling biomass conversion with Legos August 2013.docx

Adapting Hands-on Bioenergy Activities for an Alternative Online High School

Matt Hawkins, science teacher at Gull Lake Gateway Academy, MI, worked with research mentor Kay Gross at Kellogg Biological Station, engaging in a variety of research activities at the cropping system trials and working on bioenergy-related classroom activities to supplement online learning modules used at his alternative high school. By adapting existing GLBRC education materials and developing new modules, Matt created a portfolio of ten activities that can complement computer-based learning and engage students in relevant science and engineering practices. Visit the project website to learn more: http://kbsgatewayproject.weebly.com/about.html

RET Participant: Matt Hawkins

Research Mentors: Kay Gross, Kara Haas

Project Files: PDF icon Student Activity Book (final).pdf

2012

The Chemistry of Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass

Travis Tangen, a chemistry and biology teacher at Memorial High School in Madison worked with UW-Madison bioenergy chemist Troy Runge to develop an engaging lab sequence that takes students through the process of converting biomass sources, such as sawdust or corn stover, into sugars and then to ethanol. In the process, Travis conducted hundreds of trials comparing different biomass pretreatment options such as heating, grinding, and chemical digestion. The GLBRC Education & Outreach staff packaged Travis' final protocols to develop the CB2E: Converting Cellulosic Biomass to Ethanol protocol, which can be found on the GLBRC Education Materials page.

RET Participant: Travis Tangen, chemistry teacher at Madison Memorial H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Troy Runge

Sustainable Bioenergy Cropping Systems

Tammie Niffenegger, an environmental science and chemistry teacher at Port Washington H.S., got her hands dirty collecting data on bioenergy cropping systems trials at Arlington Research Station in Arlington, Wisconsin. Under the guidance of GLBRC ecologists Gregg Sanford and Randy Jackson, Tammie developed an activity in which students interpret and draw conclusions from real data on bioenergy crop traits such as total biomass and carbon sequestration rates.

RET Participant: Tammie Niffenegger, environmental science teacher at Port Washington H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Gregg Sanford, Prof. Randy Jackson

Project Files: Office presentation icon Niffenegger final presentation summer 2012.ppt, Package icon what's the most sustainanble crop.zip

Analyzing Water Usage by Bioenergy Crops

Marty Green, a middle school earth science teacher at Plainwell Schools in Michigan, had the rare opportunity to investigate how different bioenergy crops responded to this summer's extreme drought. He worked with GLBRC ecologist Steve Hamilton at Kellogg Biological Station in Hickory Corners, Michigan, to summarize thousands of data points to reveal how crops like corn and switchgrass respond to unusually dry soil conditions in cropping trials. Marty developed a classroom activity in which students draw conclusions from some of the graphs he produced in his research.

RET Participant: Marty Green, earth science teacher at Plainwell Schools, MI

Research Mentors: Prof. Steve Hamilton

Project Files: Office presentation icon Green final presentation summer 2012.ppt, Microsoft Office document icon water usage and movement in biofuel crops.doc

Agent-based Models for Bioenergy Education and Research

Kate Arnold teaches economics and environmental studies at Middleton High School in Wisconsin. She worked with GLBRC researchers, computer programmers and education researchers to develop an educational computer game in which students take on the role of bioenergy farmers to balance economic and environmental tradeoffs. Kate piloted the game with her economics students in the spring of 2013, using it as a platform to explore economic-environmental tradeoffs.

Play the Fields of Fuel educational computer game and download accompanying lessons: https://www.glbrc.org/education/classroom-materials/fields-fuel-computer-game

RET Participant: Kate Arnold, economics and environmental studies teacher at Middleton H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Gregg Sanford, Gary Oates, Prof. Michael Ferris

2011

Bioprospecting for Cellulose Degrading Microbes

Craig Kohn, agriculture and biotechnology teacher at Waterford H.S. worked with researchers in Professor Cameron Currie's lab studying the cellulose-degrading microbes in leaf-cutter ant colonies. These microbes produce cellulase enzymes which could provide the key to breaking biomass down more efficiently into biofuels. Craig developed a simple bioprospecting activity for students to test the cellulose-degrading ability of microbes in different environmental samples. For a full version of the activity and accompanying videos see the Bioprospecting for Cellulose-Degrading Microbes: Filter Paper Assay Method package on the GLBRC education materials page.

RET Participant: Craig Kohn

Research Mentors: Gina Lewin, Prof. Cameron Currie

Sustainable Bioenergy Farming Scenarios

Robyn Kademan, science teacher at Cardinal Heights Middle School, worked with ecologist Tim Meehan studying the economic and environmental tradeoffs associated with growing different bioenergy crops, such as corn, switchgrass, miscanthus and prairie. Robyn developed an educational board game in which students compete to balance earning income and environmental points on their bioenegy farms with different mixtures of crops. See the Bioenergy Farm Game on the GLBRC Education Materials page to learn more and dowload the activity.

RET Participant: Robyn Kademan, Cardinal Heights Middle School

Research Mentors: Tim Meehan

Quantitative analysis of sustainability field data

Joe Meyer, biology and environmental science teacher at Marquette University H.S., WI, joined ecologists and agronomists working with Prof. Randy Jackson's research group studying how different bioenergy crops affect the nitrogen cycle. Joe developed a dice game to help students trace nitrogen in ecosystems and an investigation to measure the effects of nitrogen on plant growth using Wisconsin Fast Plants.

RET Participant: Joe Meyer, biology and environmental science teacher at Marquette University H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Randy Jackson

Project Files: Package icon Nitrogen and Biofuels activities.zip

2010

Biofuels Life Cycle Assessment - Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Scott Kloehn, environmental science teacher at Sun Prairie H.S., WI, worked with Dr. Paul Meier and Julie Sinistore analyzing the net greenhouse gas emissions from producing biofuels from corn grain and cellulosic feedstocks. Scott developed a modeling activity in which students use spreadsheets to analyze real research data on the greenhouse gas emissions from producing and using biofuels. See the Quantitative Modeling of Biofuels Life Cycles investigation on our education materials page to download the activities.

RET Participant: Scott Kloehn, environmental science teacher at Sun Prairie H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Paul Meier, Julie Sinistore

Bioenergy Crop Breeding

Jeanine Gelhaus, 7th and 8th grade science teacher for Medford Public Schools, WI, investigated methods for breeding new corn varieties for cellulosic ethanol production under the mentorship for Professor Natalia de Leon. Jeanine worked with education staff from the GLBRC and Wisconsin Fast Plants Program to create a suite of activities to explore bioenergy concepts with Fast Plants and artificial selection for biomass production.

RET Participant: Jeanine Gelhaus, 7th and 8th grade science teacher for Medford Public Schools, WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Natalia de Leon

Project Files: PDF icon Artificial selection in plants for biomass.pdf, PDF icon Exploring Bioenergy with Fast Plants.pdf

2009

Tracing Carbon in Bioenergy Cropping Systems

Jake Eaton, science teacher at Madison Country Day School, worked with GLBRC agronomists and ecologists tracking carbon in bioenergy cropping systems. Jake developed protocols for students to investigate and measure soil respiration rates under different experimental conditions in the lab and the field. You can learn more about these protocols and download accompanying instructional materials in the Measuring Soil Microbial Activity package on the GLBRC education materials page.

RET Participant: Jake Eaton, science teacher at Madison Country Day School

Research Mentors: Gregg Sanford, Prof. Randy Jackson

Biofuels Life Cycle Assessment - Energy

James Reichling, physics teacher at Madison East H.S., WI, worked with Dr. Paul Meier and Julie Sinistore analyzing the net energy yield from producing biofuels from corn grain and cellulosic feedstocks. Jim developed a modeling activity in which students use spreadsheets to analyze real research data on the greenhouse gas emissions from producing and using biofuels. See the Quantitative Modeling of Biofuels Life Cycles investigation on our education materials page to download the activities.

RET Participant: James Reichling, physics teacher at Madison East H.S.

Research Mentors: Paul Meier, Julie Sinistore

Bioprospecting for Cellulose-Degrading Microbes

Rhonda Knapp, biology and biotechnology teacher at Waunakee H.S., worked with researchers in Professor Cameron Currie's lab studying the cellulose-degrading microbes in leaf-cutter ant colonies. These microbes produce cellulase enzymes which could provide the key to breaking biomass down more efficiently into biofuels. Rhonda developed a set of protocols for students to bioprospect for microbial communities, test their cellulose-degrading ability, and isolate individual colonies. For a full version of the protocols and accompanying instructional materials see the Bioprospecting for Cellulose-Degrading Microbes: Individual Isolate Method package on the GLBRC education materials page.

RET Participant: Rhonda Knapp, biology and biotechnology teacher at Waunakee, H.S., WI

Research Mentors: Prof. Cameron Currie